Tag Archives: handmade

A Little Bit of Weaving

…pun intended.

Today I joined Etsy Labs and Church of Craft for “Crafting in the Park.” This took place at the beautiful Brooklyn Bridge Park- Pier 1. Today was gorgeous; the weather couldn’t have been better if someone had placed an order. One of the crafts they were teaching was weaving… on a mini level.

Using a small piece of cardboard as the loom, the warp was created using butcher’s twine (I think that’s what it was) and embroidery thread as the weft. A tapestry needle served as the shuttle.

Once finished (which took over an hour, even for such a small piece), I brought it home, glued on a scrap piece of leather, and attached a pin back. Below are pics of the final product.

image

So I ended up with a tiny, wearable rug.

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Struggling

I am struggling to get good pictures for my handmade items, both for my Etsy shop and this blog.  We don’t have great natural lighting in our apartment during hours I am home and that makes a big difference.  I have been searching the interwebs, trying to find the best way to create a “home studio” using very little space, very little supplies, and very little money.  Any ideas?  Leave comments below, if so.  Anyway, bear with me as I experiment over the next few weeks.


Etsy store is open!

Not only did I list 9 pendants for sale at my Etsy store, but I got to use the word “mottled.”  I don’t think I’ve ever typed it before in my life.  Here’s my Red on Mottled Brown crocheted pendant.  (Notice the nicer outside photo shoot.)

Feel free to pass the link around to all your friends/boyfriends/husbands  🙂

Edit: great scott! If you want to see what every fiber in a piece of cotton thread looks like, click the image and then view full-size.  WOW!


River Rocks, Meet Crochet Thread

Earlier this year I began making pendants using river rocks.  I of course combined them with crochet.  Crochet thread, to be exact.  Using a teeny, tiny size B hook. (All pictures are larger than actual size.)

I was highly inspired by Resurrection Fern‘s covered stones, an example of which can be seen here.
They usually take me around 25-30 minutes each, but it is time well spent.  I love the randomness of the patterns, the spider webb-like design that unfolds as I work.

More than anything, though, I love the fact that there IS no pre-written pattern to follow.  The flow of the rock determines how each pendant is made.  In some ways, the rock decides more than I do what the final design will be, whether it is something intricate:

or something simple:

These are just of a few of my favorite ones.  You can see all 10 of them at my Flickr page.


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